Ageing and disability policies

Key features - Provides Best Practice in Accessible Tourism from a global perspective - Explores a range of approaches to delivering accessible tourism from the perspectives of policy-making, professional and stakeholder networking, market diversity, destination management and the experience economy - Contains chapters by leading experts with state-of-the-art guidance for the development of accessible tourism infrastructure, transport and services - Draws together examples of best practice encompassing policies, projects and partnerships in and between the public, private and NGO sectors, demonstrating the added value of holistic, evidence-based solutions Summary This volume presents an international selection of invited contributions on policy and best practice in accessible tourism, reflecting current practices across a range of destinations and business settings. It brings together global expertise in planning, design and management to inform and stimulate providers of travel, transport, accommodation, leisure and tourism services to serve guests with disabilities, seniors and the wider markets that require good accessibility. Accessible tourism is not only about providing access to people with disabilities but also addresses the creation of universally designed environments, services and information that can support people who may have temporary disabilities, families with young children, the ever-increasing ageing population, as well as creating safer work places for employees. The book gives ample evidence that accessible tourism organisations and destinations can expand their target markets as well as improve the quality of their service offering, leading to greater customer satisfaction, loyalty and expansion of business.

Ageing and disability policies

Bythe number of people aged 60 years and older will outnumber children younger than 5 years. The pace of population ageing is much faster than in the past. All countries face major challenges to ensure that their health and social systems are ready to make the most of this demographic shift.

People worldwide are living longer. Today, for the first time in history, most people can expect to live into their sixties and beyond. Today, million people are aged 80 years or older. Bythere will be almost this many million living in China alone, and million people in this age group worldwide.

The pace of population ageing around the world is also increasing dramatically. However, places such as Brazil, China and India will have slightly more than 20 years to make the same adaptation. By the middle of the century many countries for e. A longer life brings with it opportunities, not only for older people and their families, but also for societies as a whole.

Additional years provide the chance to pursue new activities such as further education, a new career or pursuing a long neglected passion. Older people also contribute in many ways to their families and communities.

Yet the extent of these opportunities and contributions depends heavily on one factor: There is, however, little evidence to suggest that older people today are experiencing their later years in better health than their parents. While rates of severe disability have declined in high-income countries over the past 30 years, there has been no significant change in mild to moderate disability over the same period.

If people can experience these extra years of life in good health and if they live in a supportive environment, their ability to do the things they value will be little different from that of a younger person. If these added years are dominated by declines in physical and mental capacity, the implications for older people and for society are more negative.

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Ageing explained At the biological level, ageing results from the impact of the accumulation of a wide variety of molecular and cellular damage over time. This leads to a gradual decrease in physical and mental capacity, a growing risk of disease, and ultimately, death. While some 70 year-olds enjoy extremely good health and functioning, other 70 year-olds are frail and require significant help from others.

Ageing and disability policies

Beyond biological changes, ageing is also associated with other life transitions such as retirement, relocation to more appropriate housing, and the death of friends and partners.

In developing a public-health response to ageing, it is important not just to consider approaches that ameliorate the losses associated with older age, but also those that may reinforce recovery, adaptation and psychosocial growth.

Common health conditions associated with ageing Common conditions in older age include hearing loss, cataracts and refractive errors, back and neck pain and osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, depression, and dementia.

Furthermore, as people age, they are more likely to experience several conditions at the same time. Older age is also characterized by the emergence of several complex health states that tend to occur only later in life and that do not fall into discrete disease categories.

These are commonly called geriatric syndromes.

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They are often the consequence of multiple underlying factors and include frailty, urinary incontinence, falls, delirium and pressure ulcers. Geriatric syndromes appear to be better predictors of death than the presence or number of specific diseases. Yet outside of countries that have developed geriatric medicine as a specialty, they are often overlooked in traditionally structured health services and in epidemiological research.

These factors start to influence the ageing process at an early stage. The environments that people live in as children — or even as developing foetuses — combined with their personal characteristics, have long-term effects on how they age.

Environments also have an important influence on the development and maintenance of healthy behaviours. Maintaining healthy behaviours throughout life, particularly eating a balanced diet, engaging in regular physical activity, and refraining from tobacco use all contribute to reducing the risk of non-communicable diseases and improving physical and mental capacity.

Behaviours also remain important in older age. Strength training to maintain muscle mass and good nutrition can both help to preserve cognitive function, delay care dependency, and reverse frailty.

Supportive environments enable people to do what is important to them, despite losses in capacity. The availability of safe and accessible public buildings and transport, and environments that are easy to walk around are examples of supportive environments.

Some 80 year-olds have physical and mental capacities similar to many 20 year-olds.The Centre for Policy on Ageing is an is an independent, UK based, research organisation aiming to formulate and promote social policies which will allow all older people to achieve the full potential of their later years.

CPA promotes informed debate about issues affecting older age groups, stimulates awareness of the needs of older people and encourages good practice. Mar 10,  · Healthy ageing. The population in the WHO European Region is ageing rapidly: its median age is already the highest in the world, and the proportion of people aged 65 and older is forecast to increase from 14% in to 25% in Young people accessing aged care services may be eligible for supports through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), as it .

10 facts on ageing and health. Updated May Today, for the first time in history, most people can expect to live into their sixties and beyond. Published: Fri, 24 Nov Similarities: All policies address fairness and equality without discrimination, harassment and victimization. All of them cover education, employment and public service.

Both China and NZ address a specific act or law aim at disability, they cover and clarify more aspects such as welfare, culture, rehabilitation and environment.

Ageing and disability policies

Population ageing is an increasing median age in the population of a region due to declining fertility rates and/or rising life yunusemremert.com countries have rising life expectancy and an ageing population (trends that emerged first in developed countries, but which are now seen in virtually all developing countries).This is the case for every country in the world except the 18 countries.

Ageing - Wikipedia